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Trigger Point Chart | Active vs Latent Trigger Points

What is a trigger point chart?

A trigger point is a hypersensitive spot in any muscle that has the ability to cause pain or other clinical manifestations. Trigger points can either be active or latent and can result in muscle shortness, weakness, and reduced range of motion. Let’s take a look at the difference between active and latent trigger points and how a trigger point chart can help diagnose it.

What is an Active Trigger Point?

An active trigger point means that it causes pain. Not only does it cause pain, it causes the muscles to exhibit tautness or shortening, spasm, and weakness relative to its normal state. Once the trigger points are completely eliminated the muscle will once again return to its normal strength. The longer a trigger point remains active, the more weakness occurs and the more dysfunctional the muscle becomes.

Where can I find a trigger point chart?

What is a Latent Trigger Point?

A latent trigger point won’t cause any discomfort unless it is sufficiently compressed. A latent trigger point is basically an active trigger point in waiting. It won’t cause discomfort unless it is activated. Latent trigger points may persist for months, even years, before they become active trigger points. While it might not be noticeable, the latent trigger point will still cause dysfunction, or prevent full motion and normal muscle strength.

Where Can I Find a Trigger Point Chart?

A great way to determine, and help diagnose a trigger point, is with a trigger point chart. If you are looking for trigger point charts, contact us today at Kent Health Systems.

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Trigger Point Chart | Can Yoga Help Your Back Pain?

Where can I find a Trigger Point Chart ?

If you suffer from trigger points in your back, yoga can be an effective alternative to pain medication. In fact, new research finds that yoga can be as safe and effective as physical therapy in easing pain. However, most people are still unaware that yoga can help with trigger points. Below are three yoga poses that can help with painful trigger points in your back. For more information on trigger points, check out our comprehensive trigger point chart today!

 

Downward Facing Dog Pose

Even if you aren’t in a yoga class on a weekly basis, you have probably heard of downward dog. There’s a reason why this yoga position is so well known, downward dog is a great way to elongate the cervical spine and strengthen the core, hamstrings and lower back.

 

Upward Facing Dog Pose

If you have trigger points in your back try upward facing dog. Upward facing dogs is a great stretch for your back, as well as a chest opener.

 

Cat-Cow Pose

For a gentle yet effective stretch, try the cat-cow pose.This is a great way to warm up your body and stretch your back, torso, and neck while strengthening your abdominal organs.

 

Where can I find a Trigger Point Chart ?

Purchase a Comprehensive Trigger Point Chart Today!

Quickly assess, educate and treat painful trigger points with the most comprehensive myofascial trigger point pain referral flip chart on the market. Now logically organized, color-coded, laminated for durability and printed in full color. Purchase yours today!

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First Aid Tips For Your Patients – Practice Building Tips

A simple acronym that reminds you how to treat injuries.

By David Kent, LMT, NCTMB

By David Kent, LMT, NCTMB

As a practicing massage therapist, I’m exposed to a variety of clients every day, some of whom suffer from debilitating pain brought on by soft-tissue injury. Sometimes, clients wait weeks, even months, to see me after sustaining a soft-tissue injury because they think that the pain will go away by itself; however, more often than not, by the time they do finally see me for treatment, the pain has progressed to the point that it has impeded on their daily activities.

Depending on the extent of one’s soft-tissue injury, there are steps that can be taken at the time of injury to minimize damage, reduce pain, and help aid in the healing process until the client can make it in for treatment. This article will discuss self-care first aid tips that your clients can apply when they sustain a soft-tissue injury.

Emergencies don’t occur every day, but when they do, there are simple and swift actions that can help improve the odds of a speedy recovery. There is no question that your clients will need this information at some point for either themselves or to help a friend; however, the question is: When they need the information, will they remember what to do?

The answer is yes, and it starts with the acronym R.I.C.E:

  • R – Rest the injured region or limb. Pain is the body’s way of signaling that something is wrong and needs attention. Rest will prevent further injury by not using the affected muscle(s) or joint(s).
  • I – Ice the area as soon as possible after the injury. Cold packs or ice baths will limit swelling. When using ice, be careful not to use it for too long, as this could cause tissue damage.
  • C – Compress the area with an elastic wrap or bandage to reduce swelling.
  • E – Elevate the injured body part. Elevation works with gravity to help reduce swelling by allowing fluid and blood to drain toward the heart.

However, our clients will only remember the acronym R.I.C.E. and its significance if we, as massage therapists, put into practice another acronym: R.E.S.T.

  • R – Repetition is necessary if we are to teach our clients about the importance of self-care.  Most people need to see and hear the information, as well as perform the task, numerous times before it becomes routine. During my sessions, I ensure that my clients have all the information they need via handouts, books, Web sites, and anything else that I think will be helpful. During follow-up phone calls to the client, I review the actions that I would like them to take to expedite and maintain their recovery.
  • E – Education and training are the keys to preventing and treating soft-tissue injuries.   Most clients will take appropriate action once they know what to do, when to do it, how to do it and why they are doing it. Whenever possible, I teach using as many senses as possible, including visual, auditory, kinesthetic, olfactory and gustatory. For example, when I teach a client how to use ice, instead of just talking about it, I demonstrate how to do it so that the client can feel and see the process. Then I allow the client to ask questions as they do it to themselves so they are confident with the process.
  • S – Stretching is another useful aid. (Raising your arms and yawning after getting out of bed in the morning doesn’t count!) When it comes to stretching, it is very important to describe the reasons why it is important, most notably, for injury prevention. Create a stretching routine for each of your clients depending on his or her physical condition and abilities; then demonstrate how to perform each stretch. Taking photographs while the patient stands in front of a postural analysis chart is very useful to show clients distortions in their body. This helps clients understand the stresses being placed on their joints and soft tissues.
  • T – Topicals can help by creating a cutaneous (skin) distraction, which reduces pain intensity and helps the muscles relax during stretching. I hand out trial samples to my clients for their use, and I use topicals to promote my clinic by asking my clients to give samples to friends, family and coworkers. Topicals like BioFreeze and other devices, such as the TheraBand, can also produce additional income for you if you choose to sell them in your clinic.

The educational process empowers clients on many levels. It also elevates your reputation as a highly knowledgeable massage therapist. These self-care skills are practical and will help clients who have sustained a soft-tissue injury get some instant relief from their pain. Thanks to your first aid tips, your clients will know how to help themselves and others when soft-tissue injuries arise, and they will sing high praises about the therapist who taught them.

Got some great first aid tips? Are you selling a fantastic product in your clinic? Drop me a line and share your tips!

David Kent, LMT, NCTMB

David Kent, LMT, NCTMB, is an international presenter, product innovator and writer. His clinic, Muscular Pain Relief Center, is in Deltona, Florida, where he receives referrals from various healthcare providers. David teaches Human Dissection, Deep Tissue Medical Massage and Practice Building seminars, and has developed a line of products, including the Postural Analysis Grid Chart™, Trigger Point Charts, Personalized Essential Office Forms™, and DVD programs. Visit www.KentHealtht.com or call (888) 574-5600 for more information.

David Kent – Massage Today: First Aid (08/2008)